bookmark_borderGold Comet

I never posted about my Gold Comet! The Gold Comet, or Comet D’Or, is the service order for the Barony Marche of the Debatable Lands, our local SCA group. apparently, I was given this award while we were out of the country and unable to attend the Agincourt event, but the scroll was bestowed in November at the Harvest Revel meeting.

Scroll for Gold Comet
Calligraphy and Illumination by Gesa Wellenstein

The scroll reads:

The early morning sun shines its warm rays over field and forest. There among the verdant wood glows the bright gold of a comet for our worthy Ishiyama-Shonagon Gen’tarou Yori’ie. The delicate strands of webs also gleam in the light, bedecked with morning dew. So, too, do his efforst to grow the woodworking guild please us well. For this and his numerous past services to the Barony marche of the Debatable Lands, we brandubh et Hildarun, Baron and Baroness, bestow upon him the Comet D’Or, at Agincourt on the 19th day of October, A.S. LIV.

bookmark_borderKeystone

At the 12th Night celebration of the Barony Marche of the Debatable Lands (the local SCA group), I was inducted into the Order of the Keystone of the Kingdom of Aethelmearc, the order of merit recognizing service.

Ishiyama's Keystone Scroll
Calligraphy and Illumination by Mistress Ekaterina Volkova

The scroll reads:

The quiet rabbit shapes wood, building a sound foundation of service upon which our society flourishes. Always stepping forward, Ishiyama serves through representation and organization, helping others learn the crafts of our times. Timothy and Gabrielle, Emperor and Empress of Aethelmearc, see this hard working rabbit, Ishiyama Gen’tarou Yori’ie, and bestow upon him a keystone at BMDL 12th night, January 18, AS 54.

Words by Baroness Isabel Fleuretan

I am deeply grateful to their Majesties Timothy and Gabrielle, those who recommended me for this award, and the two fine artisans who created my award scroll.

bookmark_borderJapanese Field Clothing

One of our favorite commercial sewing patterns is Folkwear #112 “Japanese Field Clothing“. I’ve used it for more than a dozen items of informal garb, and Sharon has probably used it for more than two dozen items. Monpe are basically baggy sweatpants, much like very simple hakama with only four panels total. Hippari are simple shirts with an open front that ties closed, and small sleeves. Together, they make good “peasant garb” for Pennsic, or work clothing for other events during the year. In movies, you’ll often see these garments with multiple patches and fixes, giving you the impression that most people in medieval Japan would only have one set of clothing, and they would wear that for as long as humanly possible. Anyway, they’re a good thing to have available in the Japanese medieval garb wardrobe, even though the Folkwear pattern isn’t quite medieval. Here’s the set I made in 2019 to replace some stuff I made more than a dozen years ago that I just can’t wear anymore.

Blue Linen Hippari and Black Linen Mompe
Blue Linen Hippari and Black Linen Mompe

Both of these are made from linen fabric that I bought at the fabric store. The weave on both of these is a simple weave with color threads in one direction and white threads in the other. This gives the fabric sort of a homespun appearance, in my opinion. Anyway, these two items look pretty good together.

bookmark_borderBarony Braids 2019

Normally, I try have a half dozen black and gold medallion cords braided by the time our local Agincourt event rolls around in October. This year, with everything else that was going on, I just managed to complete the sixth braid.

Barony Braids 2019

As usual, these are all about a yard long and all made from lace-weight silk yarn.